The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life

E0472


Leave a comment

Christ the King

On 20 November we celebrated the feast of Christ the King. Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 46Jeremiah 23:1-6, Colossians 1:11-20Luke 23:33-43.

Today is the last Sunday of the Christian Year when we celebrate Christ the King. Though kings are rare in modern societies, I think we are all familiar with what a king is like. When the people of Israel decided they no longer wanted God to lead them but to have a human king, God warned them what a king would be like. He would recruit their men into the army. Others would work on his land and make weapons for his campaigns. Their women would work in the kitchens. The king would help himself to the best vineyards, fields and olive groves. Of what the people had left, he would charge them taxes on their crops and livestock. The king would help himself to anything that they had and they would be servants to him. Until modern times, and certainly in the time of Jesus, that was the expectation of a king. Rich, powerful, oppressive, demanding, one who was to be served, who had the power to put his subjects to death if he so wished. Continue reading

E0543


Leave a comment

Remembrance Sunday

On 13 November we marked Remembrance Sunday. Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 98Malachi 4:1-2a, 2 Thessalonians 3:6-13Luke 21:5-19.

One facet of our common life here on Epiphany Island that never ceases to inspire many of us is the international nature of our community. It allows people from all over the world to meet together to pray and worship God. When we share special celebrations here, we try to find occasions which we have broadly in common while not being afraid to learn from one another’s traditions.

Armistice Day, 11th November, marks the signing of a treaty between Britain and its allies with Germany which brought hostilities in the First World War on the Western Front to a halt. This took effect at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918. As a result around the world various ceremonies have been held on 11th November as a time of remembering those who died. By no means every country marks this day but many of the allies involved in the original armistice do. Continue reading

E0467


Leave a comment

Resurrection hope

On 6 November Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 17:1-82 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17Luke 20:27-38.

I have friends who are philosophers. I don’t object to that but I somehow don’t think my mind works like theirs. I probably tend to be a bit more concrete in my thinking than they are. There are some questions which a philosopher might try to answer which I have also mused about. ‘Can we travel in time?’ is one such question. I like science fiction books and time travel often features in these. Sometimes, with Pontius Pilate, I have asked, ‘What is truth?’ I’ve pondered whether we have free will.

I’ve never wondered whether no one witnessing an event means it didn’t happen. Or whether a tree falling in a forest makes a sound if there is no one to hear it. I doubt if many have concerned themselves with how many angels will fit on the head of a pin, which seems to be a famous example of a philosophical question from the past. Continue reading

E0570


Leave a comment

All Saints’ Day

On 30 October we celebrated All Saints’ Day. Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 149Ephesians 1:11-23, Luke 6:20-31.

I wonder what you think of when All Saints’ Day is mentioned?

A stained-glass window or painting showing St Mary, St Peter, St Thomas etc, carefully picked out by having a halo around their heads?

A crowd of holy looking people, hands clasped in prayer, beatific smiles on their faces, eyes focused on heaven?

Martyrs for the faith, about to die horrible deaths rather than renounce their Lord?

That nice family from church who are so patient in the trials life throws at them, always concerned about others rather than themselves?

Yourselves?

Any, and all, of those fit the description of saints and today we are celebrating them. The scope of today is broad; I would like to narrow it down to the last on the list – ourselves. Continue reading

BIBLE


Leave a comment

Bible Sunday

On 23 October we celebrated Bible Sunday. Helene Milena shared a sermon by The Right Rev John Pritchard, supplied for the day by Bible Society, in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Isaiah 45:22-end, Psalm 119:129-136,  Romans 15:1-6Luke 4:16-24.

The French philosopher Voltaire once said, ‘A hundred years from my death the Bible will be a museum piece.’ A hundred years after his death the French Bible Society set up its headquarters in Voltaire’s old home in Paris.

On Bible Sunday we celebrate the most popular – but often un-read – book in the world. Under-read in the West at any rate. And yet when the new sovereign is given a Bible at his or her coronation it’s with these words, ‘We present you with this book, the most valuable thing that this world affords. Here is wisdom; this is the royal law; these are the lively oracles of God.’ You couldn’t set the bar much higher. Continue reading

36226100


Leave a comment

Bless the Lord, O my soul

On 16 October we celebrated creationtide. Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 104: 1, 11-23, Job 39:1-8, 26-30,  Luke 12:22-31.

Anyone who has followed news from the UK may have seen an item about a dispute between the Tesco supermarket chain and Unilever, an Anglo-Dutch firm which produces a variety of items usually stocked in supermarkets. Tesco objected to a 10% price rise across the range of Unilever’s products, which was blamed on the UK vote to leave the European Union. As a result, several items were no longer available to online shoppers and there was a risk that they would not be on the shelves in shops unless the dispute was resolved. Unilever’s website claims that 98% of UK households buy their products, so the potential impact was huge. Thankfully the problem seems to have ended. Fans of Marmite (yeast extract) or Hellmann’s mayonnaise or Magnum ice-creams can rest easy that their source of supply is not cut off. Continue reading

19017566


Leave a comment

Heartfelt gratitude

On 9 October, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 146, 1Timothy 6:6-19,  Luke 16:19-31.

I remember reading that it’s good to create traditions in a family as that helps to make the children feel secure; the predictability of something forms a fixed point in a changing world. When our children were young I always read stories to them. As they became older I read a chapter a night from a longer book. When we went on holiday camping in the summer we created a tradition of supper time comprising drinking hot chocolate, eating bread and chocolate spread and listening to the latest chapter of whatever book we were on at the time. On occasion we found ourselves joined by children from other families whom our own children had befriended. This tradition has become fixed in our children’s memories and remembered with fondness.

Traditions often revolve around special occasions such as holidays, birthdays, Christmas. I remember a not so happy tradition from Christmastime when I was young. On Christmas Eve my present sack was filled with gifts by Santa Claus, ready for me to find on Christmas morning. So far, so good you may say. I used to take it downstairs in the morning, sit in front of the fire and unwrap the presents. Wonderful! Lots of excitement. My mother was very organised. As each present was unwrapped, I had to give the label to my mother, on which was written the name of the giver. My mother wrote on the label what I had received. Here things become not so good. Usually by the time the next day was over, I had to have written a thank you letter to each person for each gift I received. I hated that task, I could never think what to write and by the end my hand ached. This was very much a duty on my part, although of course I enjoyed the presents I received. My mother was right to insist that I said thank you, but I certainly wished she would let me miss out on doing this. Continue reading