The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life


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Different kinds of love

On 12 February Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 119:1-8Deuteronomy 30:15-20, Matthew 5:21-37.

You’ve still got a couple of days (or just one if you live ‘down under’) to go and buy red roses, chocolates, a heart-shaped balloon and a card for the one you love. Or perhaps you prefer to let Valentine’s Day pass you by.

Valentine’s Day is big business for many. Flowers, special meals, chocolates, wine, cards, trips to Paris: if it can be marketed as something romantic, you can be sure it will be. Despite the commercialisation of the day, many really want to take the opportunity to say ‘I love you’ to someone special in their life.

For Christians, love should feature highly every day of the year. Not necessarily the romantic love, the ‘eros’ (interesting that that is an anagram of rose!) of the commercial Valentine’s Day, but the other kinds of love. Continue reading


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Unity in Christ

On 8 May, the Seventh Sunday of Easter, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 97, Acts 16:16-34, John 17:20-26.

“It’s not what you know, but who you know that matters” according to an oft-quoted piece of wisdom. If something is to get done, it can be very useful to know someone who has influence, or even someone who knows someone who has influence! There is a chance that someone might be able to “put in a good word for you”, “pull a few strings”, “tip you off” or provide “inside information” or who “knows a man who can”. Any of these might provide a slight advantage and lead to success. In a competitive world, any advantage is worth striving for.

Imagine what might happen if you knew one of the direct reports to the company owner where you wanted to work or already worked. Assuming that person was amenable to helping you, you would have a way to access the top person. The new job or the promotion you desired could come your way more easily as a result.

As Christians, we have someone available to put in a good word for us, not necessarily to get us a new job. Jesus is the Son of the owner of the universe and you can’t get anyone closer than that. The gospel passage for today records a conversation between God and Jesus and it’s about us. We get a chance to eavesdrop on the conversation. Continue reading


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Love is …

On 24 April, the Fifth Sunday of Easter, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Acts 11:1-18, Psalm 148:1-6, Revelation 21:1-6, John 13:31-35.

Are you familiar with the ‘love is …’ cartoons? These are single pictures with a short message beginning ‘love is …’. They began life in the late 1960’s as love notes sent from Kim Grove, a New Zealand artist, to Roberto Casali, who later became her husband. Kim asked Bill Asprey to take over writing and drawing the cartoon when Roberto became terminally ill. They still appear daily on his blog.

The main characters are a male and female who look like little children. The characters are shown without clothes usually but have no sexual features. The man has dark short hair and the woman has long fair hair. Occasionally children or other family members are shown also. There is a dog which also appears at times.

There are many ‘love is …’ sayings as you can imagine after such a long time. Continue reading


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The Prodigal Father

On 6 March, the Fourth Sunday of Lent, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 32, 2 Corinthians 5:16-21, Luke 15:1-3, 11b-32.

Reflections of a prodigal father:

Here’s another neighbour at the door with payment for land to help his old friend out. His eyes have the same look in them as the others – pity, disbelief, concern, puzzlement. He says nothing but I can hear the comments nevertheless. ‘That younger son of yours is making a fool of you. Why accept him asking for you to be dead? Why quietly acquiesce to his demand for half the estate? He’ll waste it all. He needs a good talking to, a bit of discipline. Mark my words. You’re far too generous for your own good.’ Continue reading