The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life


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Who is Jesus?

On 4th February 2018, the second Sunday before Lent, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 104:26-35, Colossians 1:15-20, and John 1:1-14.

It was very important that those living in Israel in the first century understood who Jesus is. God sent John the Baptist ahead of Jesus to prepare the way and prepare the hearts of the people to respond to Jesus. As we know, many did respond but others rejected him. Still others chose to condemn Jesus to death. John the Evangelist wrote his Gospel so that those who came along later could also understand who Jesus is and have the opportunity to respond. That opportunity is still available to everyone today.  Continue reading

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Candlemas

On 28 January, the fourth Sunday of Epiphany, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 24, Malachi 3:1-5, and Luke 2:22-40.

Candlemas, which we celebrated on Sunday, has many meanings. Perhaps the most poignant is the fact that Jesus is presented in the Temple as belonging to the Lord and Simeon has to tell Mary that she will suffer a sword piercing her soul. What a message to have to deliver! What a message for a young mum to hear! But the cross overshadowed Jesus from his conception. It was necessary for our salvation. Continue reading


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Christian Unity 2018

On 21 January, the Third Sunday of Epiphany, Helene Milena shared the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. This was provided for use in the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, whose theme was chosen by the churches of the Caribbean, by the Canadian Council of Churches. The readings were  Exodus 15:1-17Psalm 118: 5-7, 13-24, Mark 5:21-43.

Your right hand, O LORD, glorious in power (Ex 15:1-21)

This preaching resource was prepared by Fritz-Gerald Joseph. He was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and moved to Montreal, Canada, where he served as an associate Pastor at the Pentecostal Church Missionary of Prayer (Disciples of Christ) for 9 years. Since October 2017, he and his wife Emmanuela have been serving as Mission Co-Workers in Morocco for Global Ministries with the
Evangelical Church of Morocco. They are working alongside the Catholic Church to help and serve migrants and refugees all around the country. Continue reading


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Come and See

On 14 January, the Second Sunday of Epiphany, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 139: 1-5, 12-181 Samuel 3:1-10, John 1:43-51.

Today is the Second Sunday of Epiphany. Churches of the different traditions use this time to celebrate the revelation of Jesus to people in various ways.

The churches in the west have tended to concentrate on the visit by the magi or kings to visit Jesus when he was a young child. The magi represent all Gentiles, all non-Jews, who are included in the wonderful event of God coming to live among us. This is a reminder that there are many people around the world who have not yet heard the Gospel or seen the Christian faith in action. It’s a good time to pray for the mission of the Church around the world, and within SL of course. Continue reading


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God revealed

On 7 January, the Feast of Epiphany, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 72Isaiah 60:1-6, Matthew 2:1-12.

Most churches of the Anglican tradition and many others are named after a saint – its patron saint. On the day when that saint is remembered in the church calendar, the local church celebrates its patronal festival. Many churches are named after local saints who were remembered, and often prayed to, by the local population. Some of these churches were, and may still be, places of pilgrimage.

When it comes to cathedrals, they too are dedicated to a saint. St Peter’s in Rome is very famous, or Notre Dame (Our Lady) in Paris. In England it’s easy to forget the dedication as the cathedrals are usually referred to by where they are situated. Yesterday I was in Wakefield Cathedral (West Yorkshire) for an Epiphany Eucharist. Everyone calls it Wakefield Cathedral, that’s how it’s referred to on its website, but it is in fact the Cathedral Church of All Saints, Wakefield (a bit of a mouthful). Continue reading


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Direction of travel

On 10 December, the Second Sunday of Advent, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 85:8-13Isaiah 40:1-11, Mark 1:1-8.

If you were to look along the shelves in a bookshop or browse online, you would be able to find many books which deal with the topic of self-improvement. I suppose it’s logical to conclude that if so many books are written on the topic, there must be a ready market for them. The only reason to improve self must surely be because people are dissatisfied with the self they currently have – not fit enough, organised enough, efficient enough, slim enough, confident enough, clever enough, rich enough, and so on. There is a chronic lack of self-esteem around.

You might think that Isaiah likewise has a pretty poor opinion of the human race in general. In the midst of comforting the Jews who were exiled in Babylon, Isaiah says something that doesn’t look very comforting at all. He compares people to grass or flowers which have a transient existence – here today, gone tomorrow. It’s hardly a flattering comparison. It doesn’t confer much value on us. It’s hardly likely to bolster anyone’s self-esteem. However, from an eternal perspective it’s probably a fair comparison. In the history of the whole of creation, each human life is just a tiny blip, a little blink of light and it’s gone. Continue reading


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Advent Sunday 2017

On 3 December, Advent Sunday, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 80:1-8, 18-20Isaiah 64:1-9, Mark 13:24-37.

It’s a common observation that time passes more quickly when you are older, or so it seems. Certainly I’ve noticed quite a number of people saying things like: ‘October already. Where has the time gone?’ or ‘I can’t believe November is just about over.’ Time seems to race ahead and take some of us by surprise at the speed of its passing.

On the other hand, for many young people time seems to crawl by. Their complaint is often, ‘I can’t wait until my birthday/ our holiday/ my friend comes for a sleepover, etc’. Currently, it’s Christmas that is not coming quickly enough for many children. The excitement is more than they can bear. They ‘can’t wait’ until Christmas Eve when Father Christmas will finally set out on his journey to deliver the presents. They ‘can’t wait’ to wake up on Christmas morning and rip open the paper to see if the much coveted item is revealed ready to be played with.

Today is Advent Sunday, the day the Church particularly concentrates on its own ‘can’t wait’ moment, the one Jesus often talked about. We are focusing on the time when Jesus will come back as our King, his Second Coming. It’s something Jesus promised us. It will be an amazing occasion. Unlike his first coming, as a baby in obscurity, no one will be able to miss the Second Coming. Think about it: the sun will be dark, the moon also, stars will fall from heaven. We will see “The Son of Man coming in clouds”. I’m not sure I can conjure up a picture of how it will look, but it sounds exciting and momentous. Continue reading