The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life


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The vineyard of God

On 8 October Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 80:9-17Isaiah 5:1-7, Matthew 21:33-46.

Does anyone here have a good memory?

Thinking back over the past couple of weeks, what does the Gospel reading today have in common with the Gospel readings of last week and the week before?

Vineyards feature in all the readings. Two weeks ago we read about a landowner who employed people to work in his vineyard. He caused dissent when he paid all his workers the same regardless of how long they had worked. The vineyard there represented the kingdom of God where the first are last and the last first. Last week a man asked his two sons to work in his vineyard. One said no but later went and did as he was asked, whereas the second said yes but didn’t follow through on his words. We learnt that those who were initially not obeying God will enter the kingdom, but the ones who think of themselves as righteous but would fail to enter as they didn’t listen to God’s word. Continue reading

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Bless the Lord, O my soul

On 16 October we celebrated creationtide. Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 104: 1, 11-23, Job 39:1-8, 26-30,  Luke 12:22-31.

Anyone who has followed news from the UK may have seen an item about a dispute between the Tesco supermarket chain and Unilever, an Anglo-Dutch firm which produces a variety of items usually stocked in supermarkets. Tesco objected to a 10% price rise across the range of Unilever’s products, which was blamed on the UK vote to leave the European Union. As a result, several items were no longer available to online shoppers and there was a risk that they would not be on the shelves in shops unless the dispute was resolved. Unilever’s website claims that 98% of UK households buy their products, so the potential impact was huge. Thankfully the problem seems to have ended. Fans of Marmite (yeast extract) or Hellmann’s mayonnaise or Magnum ice-creams can rest easy that their source of supply is not cut off. Continue reading


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God in us

On 1 May, the Sixth Sunday of Easter, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Acts 16:9-15, Psalm 67, Revelation 21:1-10, 22–22:5, John 14:23-29.

It’s really difficult to work out what’s going on if you arrive in the middle of a conversation. Those who’ve been present all along obviously know the context of what is being said as you arrive but without some understanding of what went before a newcomer can find himself or herself totally confused.

Today’s passage from John is buried in what is called Jesus’ Final Discourse which took place on the night before Jesus died. Jesus washed the disciples’ feet and commended his example to his disciples as one to follow. A long conversation followed this. It’s apparent if you read the whole section that the disciples, despite being there for all the conversation, were thoroughly confused and needed to ask questions. Continue reading


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Awaiting God’s call

On 18th October, the Twentieth Sunday after Trinity, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 104:1-10, Hebrews 5:1-10, Mark 10:35-45.

If you were to ask young people what they want in life, many might look to a famous actor or singer and long to be like them. They see the adulation of the crowds; flashes as hundreds of photos are taken at film premieres and concerts; the fancy cars, jewellery and designer clothes that are the trappings of wealth. It’s understandable that a person might long for that sort of life. Success looks like that, if we are to believe the media.

Sadly that external success does not always lead to contentment. The same media that reports on the great achievements of superstars also often have the sad duty of reporting on the untimely death of those same people. They have all that they longed for but it’s not enough, or it’s too much of the wrong thing. Drugs, alcohol or suicide seem the only solutions to a dream turned sour. We’re actually not always very good at finding true success in life. Continue reading


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Growing the Kingdom of God

On 14th June, the second Sunday after Trinity, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 92:1-8, 2 Corinthians 5:6-17, Mark 4:26-34.

According to Mark, when Jesus returned from the wilderness after his temptation his message began with: ‘The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God has come near.’ We know that Jesus did and said many things, too many to fit in a world full of books according to John, but within all those things there is a recurring theme of the kingdom of God.

Talking about kingdoms would not have seemed odd when Jesus was teaching as there were many kings around, each ruling their given area and often going to war in an attempt to seize more land. However, Jesus was not talking about a physical kingdom which covered a certain area of land and had borders, passport control, taxes and so on. The kingdom of God is better thought of as the kingship of God, the rule of God in this world. Continue reading


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Gardening for God

Jesus spoke to people in parables, stories which allowed them to access what they were ready for of his message. Many parables concerned the kingdom of God which Jesus announced as he began his ministry. Jesus had the ability to connect with his audience by using scenes from everyday life that would be familiar. This inevitably involved reference to agriculture as that was a major occupation of many of the population. Two such parables are in the Gospel passage for 17 June. They challenge us to do our part in sowing the Word of God wherever we find ourselves in the world.

The Bible passages of the day were Psalm 92:1-8, 2 Corinthians 5:6-17 and Mark 4:26-34. My reflection from the noon SLT service follows.
According to Mark, when Jesus returned from the wilderness after his temptation his message began with: ‘The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God has come near.’ We know that Jesus did and said many things, too many to fit in a world full of books according to John, but within all those things there is a recurring theme of the kingdom of God.

Talking about kingdoms would not have seemed odd when Jesus was teaching as there were many kings around, each ruling their given area and often going to war in an attempt to seize more land. However, Jesus was not talking about a physical kingdom which covered a certain area of land and had borders, passport control, taxes and so on. The kingdom of God is better thought of as the kingship of God, the rule of God in this world. Continue reading