The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life


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The new covenant

On 25th March 2018, the fifth Sunday of Lent, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 119:9-16, Jeremiah 31:31-34 and John 12:20-33.

In the Church year we have moved into Passiontide, a time when our focus is on Jesus’ suffering and death on the cross. Next week we will begin following Jesus through the last week of his life. This is the part of the year when there are many special services as we try to walk through as much of that week as we can. We begin with Palm Sunday when we walk from the Peace Garden to the cathedral to recall Jesus’ ride into Jerusalem. Continue reading


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Looking to Jesus

On 15th March 2015, the fourth Sunday of Lent, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 107:1-3, 17-22, Numbers 21:4-9, and John 3:14-21.

I wonder if you would class yourself as superstitious. If you spill some salt, do you toss a pinch of it over your left shoulder into the face of the devil? Have you ever broken a mirror and expected seven years’ bad luck? Do you avoid putting shoes on a table as that causes bad luck? If the palm of your right hand itches, do you anticipate coming into money? Are you happy at the thought of the good fortune a black cat walking towards you will bring? Continue reading


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Resurrection hope

On 6 November Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were  Psalm 17:1-82 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17Luke 20:27-38.

I have friends who are philosophers. I don’t object to that but I somehow don’t think my mind works like theirs. I probably tend to be a bit more concrete in my thinking than they are. There are some questions which a philosopher might try to answer which I have also mused about. ‘Can we travel in time?’ is one such question. I like science fiction books and time travel often features in these. Sometimes, with Pontius Pilate, I have asked, ‘What is truth?’ I’ve pondered whether we have free will.

I’ve never wondered whether no one witnessing an event means it didn’t happen. Or whether a tree falling in a forest makes a sound if there is no one to hear it. I doubt if many have concerned themselves with how many angels will fit on the head of a pin, which seems to be a famous example of a philosophical question from the past. Continue reading


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To whom shall we go?

On 23rd August, the twelfth Sunday after Trinity, Helene Milena preached the following sermon in the Anglican Cathedral on Epiphany Island in Second Life. The readings were Psalm 84, Ephesians 6:10-20, John 6:56-69.

This is the fourth Sunday that the church has allocated a reading from the second half of John 6 as the Gospel for the day. This is obviously far too important a part of the New Testament for it to be quickly glanced at. It is parcelled out in small chunks to be digested with care.

During this long discourse about the Bread of Heaven the setting and the audience may have changed. Initially it was the crowd from the feeding of the 5000, presumably not all of them, who headed across the Sea of Galilee in search of Jesus who had disappeared. They found him in Capernaum, the town he seems to have made his base, and began a discussion with him. There is no indication where Jesus was as he talked to the people but it’s quite easy to believe that he was found near the shore as verse 25 says ‘they found him on the other side of the sea’. Continue reading