The Anglican Cathedral of Second Life


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St George’s Day on Epiphany Island

The Sunday after Easter Sunday is traditionally called ‘Low Sunday’ in comparison to the high feast of Easter which is the peak of the year for Christians. Perhaps, also, people feel a bit low after all the excitement of the week before (although we keep plenty of Alleluias in our services and continue to celebrate).

This year there was no chance to feel low as we had a wonderful first for Epiphany Island. We were joined by members of Second Life’s cub and scout group for the celebration of St George’s Day. Around a dozen scouts came to Epiphany Island and marched around the cathedral with their flags before lining up to greet worshippers by the door of the cathedral. They then joined us for a time of worship. You will find the sermon from the day on this blog also, but below are some photos of this special event. Continue reading


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Alleluia!!

As genuine Anglican Christians, we observe many of the ways of the offline church, with some slight adjustments at times because of our context. One of the traditions is that in Lent, there are no flowers in the church and that in services the word Alleluia is not used. In the cathedral and chapel services on Epiphany Island, we do the same. Many of us feel the lack of Alleluias to be a great sacrifice and long for their return. At our Easter Vigil, we enjoy the first use of Alleluia for six and a half weeks. Then on Easter Sunday we have many more. The atmosphere of celebration is so great that we need more than just Alleluias said, shouted and gestured. We usually have fireworks to complete our celebration, courtesy of Ana our churchwarden. This year Ana excelled herself. Fireworks went off in the Cathedral at various points in the service as well as at the end when we had completed our service at the Garden Tomb.

To give you some idea of the effect, here are some photos taken by Celberon.

The cathedral on Easter Day.

The fireworks begin!

The service has ended – coloured particles begin to appear.

The display becomes more dazzling.

The view of our celebration from a distance.